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Five Reasons Ottawa Should Not Extend Iraq Mission


Daryl Copeland gives a concise overview of why Canada needs to end its military involvement in Iraq and not extend it into Syria (“Five reasons Ottawa shouldn’t extend Iraq mission,” Toronto Star,  23 March 2015): -  Reposted on Ceasefire.ca 

1. It doesn’t work.
2. It plays into the hands of Islamic State strategists
3. It spoils Canada’s brand:
4. It reinforces the gross imbalance in the distribution of international policy resources
5. It is militarily insignificant and wasteful.

Copeland points out that Western military action has proven ineffective in defeating extremists; it destabilizes the nation and leads to the creation of groups like the Islamic State; bombing Iraq and Syria is exactly what the Islamic State wants the West to do; it plays directly into the propaganda that the West is at war with Islam; it destroys Canada's previous reputation as a force for peace; it emphasizes the military as a tool of foreign policy rather than diplomacy and development; Canada’s contribution is purely symbolic and a waste of resources.

What we should do is get out and vote for the NDP or the Greens, write letters to our MP's, educate ourselves through discussion groups. Fill the leadership void with civic literacy. Educate friends and neighbours. Be compassionate - it's not pretty dealing with our own vulnerability against centralized power.


Comments

  1. How the Conservative mind works:
    1. It doesn’t work.
    2. It plays into the hands of Islamic State strategists
    3. It spoils Canada’s brand:
    4. It reinforces the gross imbalance in the distribution of international policy resources
    5. It is militarily insignificant and wasteful.

    Therefore, we will expand our mission.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Bob. How do we reach the mind that doesn't work? Is our spiralling towards disaster a sign that our species has become a virus?

    ReplyDelete

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